Super Bowl Commercials Target Websites, Social Media

The long-awaited Super Bowl XLV is over. For some, the game was the highlight. For others, it was the commercials. Aside from the typical movie trailers and soda ads, a lot of the Super Bowl commercials had a new twist this year. Rather than just promoting a product or company, they were promoting the company’s online presence. The Internet was the main feature or at least mentioned in many of them.

Super Bowl commercials for companies like Chatter.com, Cars.com and TheDaily.com were pushing their websites. Cars.com featured Review, a commercial with talking cars discussing the reviews that were posted about them on the Cars.com website, calling one a gas guzzler and pointing out another’s big back end.

Some ads were less concerned about their products than their social media marketing campaigns. A common approach was to flash a Facebook or You Tube address at the end of the commercial, while others hinged their whole Super Bowl ad on trends in social media. Chevy’s Best First Date Ever ad was more a plug for the social networking site Facebook than for its new car. After a guy drops off his date, the first thing he does is check for Facebook updates while sitting in his Chevy Cruze. A Brisk iced tea ad featuring rapper Eminem sends the viewer to its Facebook.com/brisk page, rather than its own Lipton website.

While the Super Bowl commercials were obviously meant to be as entertaining as the football game, some of them were clearly looking for more mileage than a 60-second plug during one of the most watched TV events of the year could provide. Websites and social networking are becoming as much a target of the ads as the products and brands themselves.

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